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Deep Cleaning of Teeth

Call Now: 847.695.3368

 

860 Summit St. #134 Elgin, IL 60120

Deep Cleaning of TeethMany patients at Smiles of Elgin are surprised to learn that they have early gum disease, also known as gingivitis. The reason this catches them off guard is because they take excellent care of their oral health by brushing and flossing daily in addition to coming in for bi-annual checkups. Unfortunately, this isn’t always enough. By age 30, about half of all adults have gum disease. This jumps to three-quarters by age 60. At Smiles of Elgin, our dentists can help you reverse gingivitis with deep cleaning of teeth.

What Happens During a Deep Cleaning Session?

Patients sometimes feel confused because the terms deep cleaning, scaling, and root planing are used interchangeably. A deep cleaning session may involve one or both of these procedures. Scaling means that a dental hygienist scrapes the dental tartar from the surface of your teeth. This happens during a regular cleaning as well, but he or she typically uses more pressure and concentrates on each area longer when you come in for deep cleaning. Root planing involves smoothing out the surfaces around the roots to eliminate gum pockets or discourage them from forming in the future.
On the day of your deep cleaning appointment, you will receive an anesthetic to numb the area of your mouth undergoing scaling or root planing. We typically only complete one quadrant of your mouth at a time. This means that Dr. Hao, or Dr. Amuyan works on the top left, top right, bottom left, or bottom right in one appointment. You will need to schedule one to three additional appointments depending on how many of your teeth require deep cleaning.

Your Partner in Excellent Oral Health

We understand that staying ahead of gum disease can be challenging, especially as you get older. For most patients, scaling and root planing is enough to reverse the damage. Others may require minor oral surgery for gum pockets that are difficult to remove. Feel free to contact us at any time with questions about gum disease prevention and treatment or the procedures we use to treat it.

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    Office Hours

    Monday 10.00 to 6.00
    Tuesday 10.00 to 6.00
    Wednesday 11.00 to 8.00
    Thursday 10.00 to 6.00
    Friday 10.00 to 6.00
    Saturday 8.00 to 3.00
    Sunday Appointment only

    Treatment for Periodontal Disease

    Call Now: 847.695.3368

     

    860 Summit St. #134 Elgin, IL 60120

    When you have periodontal disease, it means that an infection is present in your gums that could affect the health and stability of your teeth. Since many people are unaware that they have periodontal disease, it tends to advance and cause additional issues. One of the most common problems is the formation of pockets in your gums that attract bacteria, tartar, and plaque. Although this occurs at the earliest stages of gum disease, it’s possible to lose teeth if the infection remains untreated. Fortunately, Smiles of Elgin patients can still reverse the damage at this point.

    What Happens During a Deep Cleaning Session

    Treatment for periodontal disease typically starts with a deep cleaning procedure. When you have this done, Dr. Qureshi, Dr. Hao, or Dr. Gargir clean only one quadrant of your mouth at a time. That is because the procedure leaves your mouth numb for several hours afterwards. The purpose of root planning and scaling during a deep cleaning appointment is to clean areas where bacteria invaded and prevent this from happening again. Your dentist will numb each area he cleans prior to beginning his work.

    Besides removing bacteria, deep cleaning reduces gum pockets and eliminates the plaque and tartar that caused them to develop in the first place. This is essential to ensure that you enjoy good oral health on a long-term basis. Before you go home, our staff will provide you with instructions on how to care for your teeth and gums at home so you won’t need to have a deep cleaning session again in the future. Some of our recommendations may include using medicated mouthwash daily, brushing your teeth with an electric toothbrush, and potentially taking prescription medication to prevent gum pockets from forming again.

    Periodontal Surgery

    When root planning and scaling fail to reduce the formation and depth of new gum pockets, your dentist at Smiles of Elgin may advise you to undergo periodontal surgery. During this procedure, he restores normal functioning to your gums by reshaping them. This keeps your teeth and gums healthy by keeping bacteria and other harmful substances from attacking them.

    If you suspect that you have gum disease, please contact our office for an appointment. You are also welcome to schedule a consultation to learn more about the various ways we treat this common dental disorder.

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      Archives

      Office Hours

      Monday 10.00 to 6.00
      Tuesday 10.00 to 6.00
      Wednesday 11.00 to 8.00
      Thursday 10.00 to 6.00
      Friday 10.00 to 6.00
      Saturday 8.00 to 3.00
      Sunday Appointment only

      What You Need to Know About Teeth Cleaning

      Call Now: 847.695.3368

       

      860 Summit St. #134 Elgin, IL 60120

      There are different types of procedures that are carried out by the dentist in the office and each one of these procedure are performed to achieve a specific goal. In some cases, the dental treatments are therapeutic and corrective in nature so they are meant to resolve all kinds of dental issues; but some of the treatment procedures can be preventive in nature, so they are performed in an effort to avoid the onset of oral disease.

      Teeth cleaning is an example of a preventive dental procedure. This dental procedure is also known as oral prophylaxis, dental cleaning or dental scaling, and it involves the cleaning of the teeth surface to remove adherent plaque, whether hard or soft.

      The following are some information you need to know about teeth cleaning:

      Patients are encouraged to visit their dentists twice a year or every six months. During these visits, it is important that they come in for a teeth cleaning. Patients are required to see their dentists twice a year for teeth cleaning; when it is impossible, at least one teeth cleaning a year may be enough. In some cases, a patient may be asked to see the dentist every week, or after three months —- this is applicable for more complicated cases where a patient’s gum condition is compromised.

      Your own efforts at home should be beneficial but they can only achieve so much. Collection at the subgingival space is not always accessed and cleaned properly through brushing and flossing. The dentist makes use of scalers that are shaped in such a way so that it can scrape through the deeper areas along the curvatures of the teeth.
      The length of time that a teeth cleaning procedure should cover will depend on the oral health condition of the patient.

      Ideally routine teeth cleaning procedures should run for about 15 to 30 minutes and that involves scaling through all the teeth in both the upper and lower arches. Sometimes, the dental condition of the patient is more severe, and more thorough scaling is required. For these cases, teeth cleaning may go for as long as an hour or two hours, especially where there is heavy staining.

      During a teeth cleaning procedure, the dentist will be scaling through the subgingival space and may touch or sever some fibrous tissue. Bleeding may be present and this should be normal, so do not be alarmed. The condition should normalize after a while, usually as soon as the procedure is completed or a few hours after the appointment.

      When normal teeth cleaning is not enough to clean and restore the teeth and gums to health, more invasive procedures may be required. Deep cleaning involves a more invasive access into the subgingival area, where much of the plaque and tartar has collected. When the bone and the roots of the teeth are affected, a surgical intervention involving some gum incision may be necessary so that the dentist can plane the roots. To remove adherent plaque in the root area, the gums will have to be incised so that the infected area can be accessed.

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        Archives

        Office Hours

        Monday 10.00 to 6.00
        Tuesday 10.00 to 6.00
        Wednesday 11.00 to 8.00
        Thursday 10.00 to 6.00
        Friday 10.00 to 6.00
        Saturday 8.00 to 3.00
        Sunday Appointment only